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Promoter

Career Highlights

  • Work in the entertainment business
  • Creative outlet
  • Always challenging
  • Not a cubicle job

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Career Summary


The task of a promoter is to develop and carry out marketing strategies for their clients, which can range from artists and club owners to national production companies. Promotors may support events such as a club's theme night, a city-wide festival, or a national film release.

Effective promoters may work with television, radio, special-events organizers, ticket retailers, or local merchants to market an event. Promoters are project-based, so the job appeals more to those who are willing to let their job security depend on their performance, rather than those who prefer a set work schedule and predictable hours. Promotors often work long hours, including nights and weekends, in the drive to carry out their duties.

Promoters are frequently "working" while they're not at work. Part of what makes a successful promotor is being able to spot -- and take action on -- an opportunity to promote, whether it's while talking to a stranger, noticing a prominent advertising space, or meeting a potential new connection.

However, being a promoter isn’t limited to talking and posting events. Promoters often work within a team that may include artists, financers, writers and producers, and these elements might have conflicting views. Compromising to create a successful campaign that benefits everyone adds a degree of frustration to the job.

Creativity is also important, as traditional advertising and marketing strategies may be expensive. A successful promoter utilizes creative strategies in the least expensive ways to let people know about an upcoming event. An unlimited imagination can outmatch the most limited budget.

Attention to detail is very important. A great promoter will bend over backwards for the paying guests, the talent and even the vendors who will be selling at the events. Going the extra mile in hospitality, information and services for your event is a crucial part of keeping them coming back in the future. The lure of being a promoter is that mere ideas are turned into reality, and successful events are intoxicating. But an unsuccessful project can also curtail the success of future projects. A promoter cannot afford to be associated with a failed marketing strategy.

Promoting is a lot like high-risk gambling – high risk that can produce high-returns or deep financial loss. Not paying attention to details can be a big mistake, since some details can be amazingly easy to lose any and all profits through one poor decision. This is why most successful promoters have marketing and or advertising degrees.

Salary

$30,000*

Education

Requires a degree in:

  • Advertising
  • Business Management
  • Marketing

Career Skills

  • Work and coordinate with bands, artists, vendors, location managers, security officers and agents
  • Booking venues
  • Promote the events
  • Coordinate schedules
  • Work with print artists and printing companies

Additional Information

References

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*Salary ranges based on location, experience, and demand. This number represents a rough nation-wide average.